I’m A Little Teapot (Nursery Rhyme)

I’m A Little Teapot, also known as The Teapot Song, is a popular American children’s song or “nursery rhyme” from the United States of America.

Background/ History/ Origin:

Clarence Z. Kelley and George Harold Sanders originally wrote the song and published it in year 1939.

The song or “rhyme” started when Clarence Kelley, along with his wife, managed a dance school that especially catered for children. They taught the kids the popular tap dance routine called the “Waltz Clog,” but the younger students found the dance too difficult to master. The Teapot Song was used instead because it involved only minimal skills, aside from encouraging natural pantomime.

Since then, the “Teapot Song”, with its “Teapot Tip” dance, became immensely popular not just in America but overseas as well.

Song/Rhyme Meaning: 

The Tea pot song/ nursery rhyme describes a  tea pot or whistling kettle’s heating (then pouring) into tea cups with tea bag or tea leaves. It’s a favorite action song for kids.

Lyrics: 

 I’m a little teapot,
Short and stout.
Here is my handle,
Here is my spout.
When I get all steamed up,
Hear me shout!
Tip me over and pour me out.

NOTE: Other versions use “When the water’s boiling” instead of “When I get all steamed up” and “Lift me up” instead of “Tip me over.” (They are easier to say, for some.)

Alternate Lyrics:

I’m a little teapot,
Short and stout.
Here is my handle,
Here is my spout.
When the water’s boiling,
Hear me shout!
Lift me up and pour me out.

Advertisements

Hickory Dickory Dock (Nursery Rhyme)

Hickory Dickory Dock, also known as Hickety Dickety Dock, is a very popular traditional English nursery rhyme (from England).

Background/ History/ Origin:

The rhyme’s earliest recorded version is in Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song Book, which was published in 1744 (London). Its opening line was ‘Hickere, Dickere, Dock’.

Its next popular version is in Mother Goose’s Melody (published around 1765), which instead opens with the line ‘Dickery, Dickery, Dock’.

Other versions also include ‘Hickety, Dickety, Dock,’ however, the most common modern version is called ‘Hickory, Dickory, Dock’:

(Modern) Lyrics: 

Hickory, dickory, dock.
The mouse ran up the clock.
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down,
Hickory, dickory, dock.

ALSO NOTE: Instead of “the mouse ran down,” other (earlier) versions use “down the mouse ran” or “and down he ran.”

Old (Mother Goose) Lyrics:

Hickety, dickety, dock,
The mouse ran up the clock;
The clock struck one,
Down the mouse ran,
Hickety, dickety, dock.

 

Clock Times

Clock Times (Hourly)

– How to tell the time by hours (chart/ image)

– Note: Hour hands (the short clock hands) tell the hour

(EXAMPLE: the short hand pointing at 1 or 2 or 3 or 4, etc., and the long hand pointing at 12 reads 1 o’clock, 2 o’clock, 3 o’clock, or 4 o’clock, etc.)

Clock Times

Clock hours (jpg)

(Source: 123rf.com)

Download/ Print: clock times 1 (pdf, 213 KB)